Study Shows Coffee May Improve Your Eyesight

Coffee is full of antioxidants. Like other foods full of antioxidants, it sometimes takes scientists a while to determine what, exactly, the benefits of those antioxidants are. A recent study about coffee revealed that some of the antioxidants in coffee may be very good for your eyesight. The study, published recently in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry and conducted by researchers at Cornell University, showed that chlorogenic acid, a strong antioxidant in coffee, prevented retinal deterioration in mice. Retinal deterioration is something that can be caused by glaucoma, diabetes and just by aging and is something that affects many people as they go through life, leading to partial or complete blindness. This study is great news for coffee lovers, as they are most likely helping to protect their eyesight by enjoying that daily cup of coffee every morning.

The antioxidant has also been linked to other health benefits, such as weight loss and reduction of blood pressure, so there are a few other potential health benefits in addition to helping to improve and protect your eyesight.

Caffeine help with weight loss

Caffeine alone won’t help you slim down. It may slightly boost weight-loss efforts or help prevent weight gain, and there’s solid evidence that caffeine consumption leads to noticeable weight loss. You might want to add dianabol to your coffee to give you the extra energy you need to loose your body fat.

Caffeine is found in many beverages, including coffee, tea, energy drinks and colas, and in products containing cocoa or chocolate. It’s also found in medications and dietary supplements, including supplements aimed at weight loss, like BioHarmony, recently reviewed at Healthmania.

Although research about the connection between caffeine and weight isn’t definitive, there are a few theories about how caffeine might affect weight, including:

  • Appetite suppression. Caffeine may reduce feelings of hunger and your desire to eat for a brief time.
  • Calorie burning. Caffeine appears to increase energy use even when you’re at rest. It stimulates thermogenesis — one way your body generates heat and energy from digesting food.

Some studies looking at caffeine and weight were poor quality or done in animals, making the results questionable or hard to generalize to humans. Some studies found that decaffeinated coffee may contribute to modest weight loss, suggesting that substances or factors besides caffeine may play a role in weight loss.